Proyecto Matria, Miraflores

Even before hurricanes Irma and Maria passed over the island, the independent art and culture scene of Puerto Rico was in a state of chronic crisis. Austerity measures have long limited the state's economic support of the arts. Alternate sources of funds generally establish that projects must have an educational focus or generate economic activity, not those that simply have an aesthetic or artistic purpose. On the other hand, the need to work in advertising and other industries hinders the ability of local artists to focus their energy and resources on their own projects.

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During the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, mental health professionals observed that emotional and social reactions to a catastrophic event manifested fully a year or year and a half later. In Puerto Rico, seven months after hurricanes Irma and Maria, symptoms of stress and anxiety are starting to surface, particularly in children and in certain vulnerable families.

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One week after Hurricane Maria, the Ponce Museum of Art (MAP by its Spanish initials) opened its doors to the public, offering free admission, as well as guided tours, art workshops, and storytelling for children. It became a space for recharging and relief in the midst of the crisis that followed the storm. Of the almost 3,600 people who visited the MAP that month, about a third didn't participate in any activities. They simply sat down to contemplate the art or walked through the halls of the museum.

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